Taking Stuff Apart: Panasonic WV-200 Video Camera

I couldn't find any references to this camera aside from the tube - a 20PE13A which has a few ebay auctions for $50-$70 right now. If anyone knows anything about its history I'd be curious to hear it.

Since I don't know anything about it, here it is:
Panasonic WV-200 - Side



Bottom / Mounting bracket:
Panasonic WV-200 - Bottom

Front / Lens. I'm not sure if there was some sort of optics that someone else took or not:
Panasonic WV-200 - Front off

The bottom came right off after a few screws, hey there's some sort of tube in there!
Panasonic WV-200 - Some tube!

The rest came right off after a few more screws:
Panasonic WV-200 - Cover off

There were two PCBs with the components sandwiched in the center:
Panasonic WV-200 - Back

They came right off too:
Panasonic WV-200 - Circuits

This thing is apparently some sort of photo sensor:
Panasonic WV-200 - Camera enclosure

Nothing in the big metal cylinder actually touches the tube:
Panasonic WV-200 - Camera Tube

After cracking open the transformer, all evidence suggests that its ancient:
Panasonic WV-200 - Transformer inside

All done, not much to salvage out of this thing unfortunately:
Panasonic WV-200 - In pieces

As usual you can find more pictures on my flickr page by clicking on any of the images above. If you have any information about how that tube works I'd be curious to hear it.

1 comments:

Tom D. said...

Congratulations, any operation you MAY have had before is now gone. Exposure of the vidicon (20PE13A) to "raw" light destroys the coating, thus the operation. These cameras were very popular in the early to late 70's for surveillance. The most frequent failure (aside from damaged vidicon tubes) was the EHD-AD2503 IC, which provided a 6v voltage potential ACROSS the vidicon tube's filament. When the chip crapped out (as it often did), there was no potential-difference, thus no filament,thus NO image. I repaired HUNDREDS of them.

Tom - Denver

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